Monthly Archives: August 2010

The Vidocq Society: Solving Murders Over Lunch

The Murder Room

The Connoisseurs of Murder

The great hall was filled with the lingering aroma of pork and mallard duck sausage as black-vested waiters appeared, shouldering cups of vanilla bean blancmange. Connoisseurs sat at tables between the hearths under glittering eighteenth-century chandeliers, chatting amiably in several languages. When the coffee arrived, a fine Colombian supremo steaming in its pots, the image of the corpse of a young man of uncommon beauty, lying on his back, materialized in the center of the room.

A gray winter light slanted into the hall, as the midday sun had sailed beyond the city, and the image on the large screen was crisp. The young man’s blond locks were matted in a corona of dried blood, his sculpted cheekbones reduced to a pulp. The police photograph had been taken at night in

Read more at: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129032377

Vidocq Takes Leah Freeman Case

In the summer of 2000, 15-year-old Leah Freeman went missing in Coquille, Ore. For almost a week, the Coquille Police Department, led by Chief Mike Reeves, treated it as a missing person case, believing that the teen had run away.

Yet on the night the teen disappeared, an ominous discovery was made. A man picked up a shoe by the side of a town road. He thought it belonged to his daughter. It was not until days later, after the town’s search for Leah had grown increasingly anxious, that he turned the shoe over to police.

The police identified the shoe as Leah’s. On it they discovered blood.

Six weeks passed before Leah’s mother, Cory Courtright, got the call from police that would end her hopes that Leah was still alive. Another discovery had been made.

“I still let the denial take over,” Courtright said. “I wanted to… I wanted

Read more at: http://abcnews.go.com/2020/leah-freeman-oregon-teen-murder-vidocq-society/story?id=11374958

Cold Case Squad: Modern-Day ‘Sherlock Holmes’ Team Takes on Oregon Slaying

In the summer of 2000, 15-year-old Leah Freeman went missing in Coquille, Ore. For almost a week, the Coquille Police Department, led by Chief Mike Reeves, treated it as a missing person case, believing that the teen had run away.

Yet on the night the teen disappeared, an ominous discovery was made. A man picked up a shoe by the side of a town road. He thought it belonged to his daughter. It was not until days later, after the town’s search for Leah had grown increasingly anxious, that he turned the shoe over to police.

The police identified the shoe as Leah’s. On it they discovered blood.

Six weeks passed before Leah’s mother, Cory Courtright, got the call from police that would end her hopes that Leah was still alive. Another discovery had been made.

“I still let the denial take over,” Courtright said. “I wanted to… I wanted

Read more at: http://abcnews.go.com/2020/leah-freeman-oregon-teen-murder-vidocq-society/story?id=11374958

The Secret World of Earth’s Best Detectives

There are an estimated 100,000 uncaught killers in the United States. Cops are overworked, departments underfunded, and as many as one in three murders goes unsolved. But the Vidocq Society — named after Eugene Francois Vidocq of Paris, the world’s first detective and founder of France’s Brigade de la Sûreté police force — hunts down the murderers, frees the innocent, and succors the families victimized by crime.

It is one of the world’s most exclusive clubs, open only to the best detectives and forensic scientists on the planet — the greatest gathering of such talent ever assembled in one room. There are never more than 82 members at a time, one for each year of Vidocq’s life. They hail from 28 law-enforcement agencies in 12 countries, including the FBI, CIA, Interpol, Scotland Yard, Hong Kong Police, NYPD, Brigade de la Sûreté, DEA, ATF, Secret Service, Treasury Department,

Read more at: http://www.esquire.com/news-politics/news/a8211/vidocq-society-members-081010/