Category Archives: Innocence Project

Oregon murder case shows obstacles to DNA testing – The Spokesman

SALEM – Jesse Johnson was accused in 1998 of fatally stabbing a nurse’s aide in her apartment. He repeatedly said he was innocent, his DNA wasn’t on any of the tested murder evidence, and he refused a plea deal. Johnson was convicted of aggravated murder and sentenced to death.

Nearly two decades after Harriet Thompson, 28, was killed in Salem, a judge is considering a request from the Oregon Innocence Project to allow DNA testing of crime-scene evidence in the case.

The tests, using techniques that had not been developed when Johnson went on trial in 2004, could lead to the real killer and exonerate Johnson, his lawyers say.

“This case cries out for finding out what’s in those other items,” Steven Wax, legal director of the Oregon Innocence Project, told the judge. “The person who was convicted is excluded from so many pieces of evidence in the crime. There

Read more at: http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2017/oct/17/oregon-murder-case-shows-obstacles-to-dna-testing/

He spent 21 years locked up for a murder he says he didn’t commit. Soon, he’ll be free

Domingo Bustos Anaya on Monday pleaded no contest to voluntary manslaughter for a murder he says he did not commit. He’s spent the past 21 years in prison for that crime, but another man has come forward and claimed responsibility for the shooting that killed Luz Ortiz in Stanislaus County.

Anaya, 43, agreed to a compromise with prosecutors so he could be set free and return to Mexico. Paige Kaneb, Anaya’s attorney, said it’s not the kind of justice her client deserves, but the plea deal was the only guarantee Anaya wouldn’t spend the rest of his life behind bars.

“It maybe isn’t perfect justice, but he’s more familiar than most of us with the fact that life is not perfect,” said Kaneb of the Northern California Innocence Project, which sought a new trial for Anaya.

Deputy District Attorney John R. Mayne, who worked closely with Anaya’s attorneys on the deal, said the

Read more at: http://www.modbee.com/news/local/crime/article179224701.html

He spent 21 years locked up for a murder he says he didn’t commit …

Domingo Bustos Anaya on Monday pleaded no contest to voluntary manslaughter for a murder he says he did not commit. He’s spent the past 21 years in prison for that crime, but another man has come forward and claimed responsibility for the shooting that killed Luz Ortiz in Stanislaus County.

Anaya, 43, agreed to a compromise with prosecutors so he could be set free and return to Mexico. Paige Kaneb, Anaya’s attorney, said it’s not the kind of justice her client deserves, but the plea deal was the only guarantee Anaya wouldn’t spend the rest of his life behind bars.

“It maybe isn’t perfect justice, but he’s more familiar than most of us with the fact that life is not perfect,” said Kaneb of the Northern California Innocence Project, which sought a new trial for Anaya.

Deputy District Attorney John R. Mayne, who worked closely with Anaya’s attorneys on the deal, said the

Read more at: http://www.modbee.com/news/local/crime/article179224701.html

Midwest Innocence Project continues advocating for wrongly convicted prisoners after they’re freed

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — After Lamonte McIntyre’s release on Friday after 23 years in prison prompted many questions in the community, including: what’s next?

On Monday, Richard Jones met with FOX 4. Jones, or perhaps his mug shot, may be familiar to many from the summer of 2017. He served 17 years from a crime he didn’t commit. Now, he’s trying to start over.

But, as he told FOX 4, it’s hard. He can often be found in the office of the Midwest Innocence Project. The organization advocated for him when he was in prison and now that he’s out of prison.

“Just how fast it is out here,” Jones said Monday, “just everyday living.”

Life moves pretty fast these days for Jones, which is tough for a man who spent 17 years on prison time.

“I just got to get used to the everyday living,” he said, “which I am,

Read more at: http://fox4kc.com/2017/10/16/midwest-innocence-project-continues-advocating-for-wrongly-convicted-prisoners-after-theyre-freed/

Amid ‘Free Lamonte’ chants, hearing begins in case of KCK man imprisoned for 23 years

On the day Lamonte McIntyre was sentenced to consecutive life terms in prison, he said just 13 words to the court:

“Judge, I would like to tell the court that I’m innocent. That’s all.”

On Thursday, more than two decades later, McIntyre’s family and friends poured into a Wyandotte County courtroom for a hearing that has called into question the imprisonment of a 17-year-old man.

McIntyre, now 41, smiled at the approximately 50 friends and relatives who had assembled in the courtroom.

An innocent man has languished in prison for 23 years, his loved ones say. In a rally outside the courthouse beforehand, they cried: “I say free, you say Lamonte.”

“Free!”

“Lamonte!”

Lamonte 01

Read more at: http://www.kansascity.com/news/local/article178461766.html

Lamonte McIntyre hearing: innocent man imprisoned, family, experts …

On the day Lamonte McIntyre was sentenced to consecutive life terms in prison, he said just 13 words to the court:

“Judge, I would like to tell the court that I’m innocent. That’s all.”

On Thursday, more than two decades later, McIntyre’s family and friends poured into a Wyandotte County courtroom for a hearing that has called into question his conviction.

McIntyre, now 41, smiled at the approximately 50 friends and relatives who had assembled in the courtroom as he entered.

He’s an innocent man who has languished in prison for 23 years, his loved ones say. In a rally outside the courthouse beforehand, they cried: “I say free, you say Lamonte.”

“Free!”

“Lamonte!”

Lamonte 01

Read more at: http://www.kansascity.com/news/local/article178461766.html

Many law enforcement agencies don’t follow state lineup, interrogation rules, study says

Many law enforcement agencies do not follow a law designed to prevent innocent people from being locked up in prison, according to a study by the Ohio Innocence Project.

The law, passed in 2010, requires law enforcement agencies to use “blind” suspect lineups in which the investigator or officer administering the lineup either isn’t involved in the case or doesn’t know the identity of the suspect. Law enforcement can also use a photo lineup technique in which only the witness can see the pictures to ensure they aren’t biased. It also recommends, but doesn’t require, recording interrogations.

About two-thirds of the 156 law enforcement agencies responding to a survey by the Innocence Project, based at the University of Cincinnati College of Law and the School of Criminal Justice, said they have a

Read more at: http://www.dispatch.com/news/20171011/many-law-enforcement-agencies-dont-follow-state-lineup-interrogation-rules-study-says

Indiana man says DNA proves innocence in 1975 Fairfax County rape

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Read more at: http://www.richmond.com/news/virginia/indiana-man-says-dna-proves-innocence-in-fairfax-county-rape/article_3d91f9b8-fc19-5348-b93b-d8fd2843e9da.html