Category Archives: Innocence Project

Man exonerated, released 38 years later leaves prison with puppy

(INSIDE EDITION) — A wrongfully convicted man has finally walked free, 38 long years after he was sentenced to life in prison for a rape he did not commit, and he didn’t leave alone.

Innocent, a 9-month-old black Lab he raised while behind bars, was also set free by the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola.

“I named her Inn because I was innocent and she was innocent,” Alexander said. Asked what he planned to do with his four-legged friend now they were both free, the former inmate replied, “We going to the park and we’re going to chase birds. She likes to chase birds.”

Alexander was 21 when he was sentenced to Angola. His case was hampered by incompetent legal counsel, according to the Innocence Project, a nonprofit organization that helps exonerate those wrongfully imprisoned by reopening their cases and conducting DNA tests on evidence from their trials.

In Alexander’s case, genetic testing

Read more at: http://www.whas11.com/article/news/nation/man-exonerated-released-38-years-later-leaves-prison-with-puppy/417-522939394

Cuyahoga County set to pay $4.5 million to three East Cleveland men freed on overturned murder convictions

CLEVELAND, Ohio — Cuyahoga County has agreed to pay $4.5 million to three East Cleveland men who served two decades in prison for murder convictions that were later overturned.

The settlement will resolve claims of wrongdoing made by Laurese Glover, Eugene Johnson and Derrick Wheatt against the county and former county prosecutors Carmen Marino and Deborah Naiman.

The three men were convicted in the 1995 death of Clifton Hudson and were released from prison in 2015 when a judge granted new trials based on new information.

The County Council is expected to approve the settlement at a meeting Tuesday. The settlement is the product of negotiations that have taken place over the past few weeks. If approved, each man will get $1.5 million.

It was not immediately clear whether the proposed settlement would also resolve claims the trio made against East Cleveland and its detectives. Court filings indicate that is likely not the

Read more at: http://www.cleveland.com/court-justice/index.ssf/2018/02/cuyahoga_county_set_to_pay_45.html

Free after 22 years: Man visits UIS to thank those who exonerated him – The State Journal

A 61-year-old man who spent more than 22 years in prison for a crime he didn’t commit said he doesn’t see any reason to be angry.

“I’m overwhelmed. I don’t think being bitter is going to help me,” William “Bill” Amor said Friday during an interview at the University of Illinois Springfield, home of the Illinois Innocence Project.

Amor was convicted of arson and murder in connection with a Sept. 10, 1995, fire in Naperville that killed his mother-in-law. The fire occurred in an apartment that Amor and his wife shared with his wife’s mother.

Attorneys at the Illinois Innocence Project say Amor gave a false confession after 15 hours of questioning.

Larry Golden, founding director of the Innocence Project, said that in the false confession, Amor said he poured vodka on newspapers and then used a cigarette to light the fire.

“At

Read more at: http://www.sj-r.com/news/20180223/free-after-22-years-man-visits-uis-to-thank-those-who-exonerated-him

Malcolm Alexander Case: Exonerated and Released After 38 Years, He Leaves Prison With a Puppy

A wrongfully convicted man has finally walked free, 38 long years after he was sentenced to life in prison for a rape he did not commit, and he didn’t leave alone.

Innocent, a 9-month-old black Lab he raised while behind bars, was also set free by the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola.

“I named her Inn because I was innocent and she was innocent,” Alexander said. Asked what he planned to do with his four-legged friend now they were both free, the former inmate replied, “We going to the park and we’re going to chase birds. She likes to chase birds.”

Alexander was 21 when he was sentenced to Angola. His case was hampered by incompetent legal counsel, according to the Innocence Project, a nonprofit organization that helps exonerate those wrongfully imprisoned by reopening their cases and conducting DNA tests on evidence from their trials.

In Alexander’s case, genetic testing eliminated him as a suspect. Innocence

Read more at: http://nbc4i.com/2018/02/23/malcolm-alexander-case-exonerated-and-released-after-38-years-he-leaves-prison-with-a-puppy/

Malcolm Alexander Case: Exonerated and Released After 38 Years …

A wrongfully convicted man has finally walked free, 38 long years after he was sentenced to life in prison for a rape he did not commit, and he didn’t leave alone.

Innocent, a 9-month-old black Lab he raised while behind bars, was also set free by the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola.

“I named her Inn because I was innocent and she was innocent,” Alexander said. Asked what he planned to do with his four-legged friend now they were both free, the former inmate replied, “We going to the park and we’re going to chase birds. She likes to chase birds.”

Alexander was 21 when he was sentenced to Angola. His case was hampered by incompetent legal counsel, according to the Innocence Project, a nonprofit organization that helps exonerate those wrongfully imprisoned by reopening their cases and conducting DNA tests on evidence from their trials.

In Alexander’s case, genetic testing eliminated him as a suspect. Innocence

Read more at: http://nbc4i.com/2018/02/23/malcolm-alexander-case-exonerated-and-released-after-38-years-he-leaves-prison-with-a-puppy/

Innocence Project Says DOJ is Turning Dangerously Away From Ensuring that Forensic Testimony is Guided by …

Fifty-five-year-old Jimmy Genrich of Grand Junction, Colorado, has been in prison for nearly 25 years for series of bombings he has long said he did not commit. His conviction for the bombings that terrified residents of Grand Junction was based primarily on something called explosives toolmark analysis, a pattern-matching process akin to the controversial art of bite mark analysis, which provided the only physical evidence connecting Genrich to the crimes.

In a deeply-researched longread for the The Nation, Meehan Crist and Tim Requarth wrote about Genrich’s case, which has been taken up by the Innocence Project. In the course of their research, the reporters examined thousands of pages of trial transcripts, and interviewed dozens of prosecutors, defense attorneys, and scientists, which let them to conclude there was “a startling lack of scientific support for forensic pattern-matching techniques such as toolmark analysis,” that our legal system “has failed to

Read more at: http://witnessla.com/innocence-project-says-doj-is-turning-dangerously-away-from-ensuring-that-forensic-testimony-is-guided-by-science-not-law-enforcement-prosecutors/

Philly man claims he’s innocent of 1991 killing. Courts say it’s too late

For more than 26 years, Eric Riddick has been locked up for a Southwest Philadelphia murder. He’s been trying to persuade judges that he didn’t commit the crime.

But Riddick offered his petitions too late under the rules for criminal appeals. In fact, accompanying the December opinion denying his latest appeal was a judge’s blunt assessment that Riddick may not be a killer, but a victim of a flawed system.

“It is clear to all,” Superior Court Judge John T. Bender wrote, “that it is likely that an innocent man sits behind bars for no better reason than a poorly conceived statute.”

Then-Senior Judge James J. Fitzgerald III joined in Bender’s statement.


Under the state’s Post Conviction Relief Act, a defendant must file a petition for relief within a year of the judgment becoming final. There are a few exceptions, one of which is if

Read more at: http://www.philly.com/philly/news/crime/eric-riddick-1991-shooting-death-appeal-window-superior-court-decision-20180223.html

I Sent an Innocent Man to Prison

I can picture Kia now at the defense table, slumped down, doodling on a pad. I was reading his body language, and he just didn’t seem to care about what was going on. I thought, if he doesn’t care, why should we? His attitude seemed to say: Yeah, I did it.

It was my first time on a jury. I was 31, balancing two jobs while going to graduate school. It was 2009, New Orleans was infested with crime, and I remember feeling like I wanted to be part of justice. During jury selection, the prosecutors asked if I could convict someone based on the testimony of a single eyewitness, and I said, in theory, I could.

Read more at: https://www.themarshallproject.org/2018/02/22/i-sent-an-innocent-man-to-prison

I Sent an Innocent Man to Prison | The Marshall Project

I can picture Kia now at the defense table, slumped down, doodling on a pad. I was reading his body language, and he just didn’t seem to care about what was going on. I thought, if he doesn’t care, why should we? His attitude seemed to say: Yeah, I did it.

It was my first time on a jury. I was 31, balancing two jobs while going to graduate school. It was 2009, New Orleans was infested with crime, and I remember feeling like I wanted to be part of justice. During jury selection, the prosecutors asked if I could convict someone based on the testimony of a single eyewitness, and I said, in theory, I could.

Read more at: https://www.themarshallproject.org/2018/02/22/i-sent-an-innocent-man-to-prison

Illinois Innocence Project Clears Man Once Accused Of 1995 Fatal Arson

An Illinois man was found “not guilty” today for an arson case dating back to 1995. Bill Amor already spent 22 years in prison for a crime he says he didn’t commit.

Amor lived in Naperville in an apartment he shared with his wife and her mother. A fire at that apartment  in 1995 killed his mother-in-law.  Amor says he was at a movie with his wife when the fire broke out. Law enforcement at the time immediately pinned Amor as a suspect.

He spent two weeks in jail and after hours of grueling questioning, he gave in and offered a false confession. That’s what a lawyer for the Illinois Innocence Project, Lauren Kaeseberg, says.

“Bill wanted to make the questioning stop, which is the phenomena we see with false confessions,” she said. “He presumably thought this would all work itself out later. He was psychologically traumatized.”

Kaeseberg

Read more at: http://peoriapublicradio.org/post/illinois-innocence-project-clears-man-once-accused-1995-fatal-arson