Category Archives: Murder Accountability Project

As murder rate rises in Phoenix, the number of unsolved cases is growing, too

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Amid a recent spike in Phoenix homicides, a higher percentage of cases are going unsolved. The clearance rate of murders is about the same as the national average, but it used to be much higher.
Wochit

The further away in time that Christy Davey’s murder gets, the more her family worries it won’t be solved.

“We’re coming up on two years — it’s scary for us all,” her sister, Heather Davey, said in a recent interview. “I just don’t know where to go from here.”

The 24-year-old mother’s body was found in March

Read more at: https://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/phoenix/2018/02/20/phoenix-murders-rise-solving-rates-drop-murder-rates-rising/339276002/

Indianapolis police are getting help with homicides — from outside experts

Indianapolis Metropolitan Police command staff have asked outside experts to help with the growing number of unsolved homicide cases, a problem that has nagged Indianapolis and other major cities in recent years.

A full assessment of how the department investigates and responds to homicides is planned. Every step — dispatching an initial call, collecting DNA, talking to eyewitnesses and more — will be up for review. 

“We have some numbers that are disappointing to us,” said Chris Bailey, IMPD’s deputy chief of investigations. “The only way to get better is to recognize that you don’t have all the answers.” 

Those disappointing numbers have been

Read more at: https://www.indystar.com/story/news/crime/2018/02/15/indianapolis-police-getting-help-homicides-outside-experts/336825002/

How serial killers capitalize on chaos, according to an expert

The term “safe space” is a misnomer. Try as one may, no spaces, much less a university campus, can ever be truly hermetically sealed. The more effort it takes to engineer these spaces, as it turns out, the greater the real danger..theconversation.com/content/90995/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic” alt=”The Conversation” width=”1″ height=”1″ /

Whether it’s 1967 or 2018, campus predators will always know as much.

Read more at: https://www.salon.com/2018/02/13/how-serial-killers-capitalize-on-chaos-according-to-an-expert_partner/

How serial killers capitalise on chaos, according to an expert

In 2017, the University of Wisconsin-Madison was ranked by the Princeton Review as the top party school in the United States, but it’s also the focus of my recent true crime title, Mad City.

That’s because in the wake of the summer of love in 1967 – from the late 1960s through to the mid-70s – the university was a much different kind of place.

It was a period when anti-Vietnam War protests and inevitable counter-protests supplemented draft-card burnings. Sit-ins meant to waylay political visits and right-of-centre speakers were all at high tide.

Sound familiar?

The UW campus at the time was the epicentre of a particularly vitriolic brand of hyper-partisan tribalism as members of the Chicago Seven, and the more violent Weather Underground, were assembling in what was a progressive island in an ocean of old-fashioned – and often intolerant – dairyland social conservatism.

A homegrown group, known as the New Year’s Gang, was allowed to

Read more at: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/how-serial-killers-capitalize-on-chaos-according-to-an-expert-a8194826.html

How serial killers capitalize on chaos

In 2017, the University of Wisconsin-Madison was ranked by the Princeton Review as the top party school in the United States, but it’s also the focus of my recent true crime title, Mad City.

That’s because in the wake of the so-called Summer of Love in 1967 — from the late 1960s through to the mid-70s — the university was a much different kind of place.

It was a period when anti-Vietnam War protests and inevitable counter-protests supplemented draft-card burnings. Sit-ins meant to waylay political visits and right-of-centre speakers were all at high tide.

Sound familiar?

The UW campus at the time was the epicentre of a particularly vitriolic brand of hyper-partisan tribalism as members of the Chicago Seven, and the more violent Weather Underground, were assembling in what was a progressive island in an ocean of old-fashioned — and often intolerant — dairyland social conservatism.

A homegrown group, known as

Read more at: https://www.rawstory.com/2018/02/serial-killers-capitalize-chaos/

Professor touts ‘the Uber of homicides’ | The London Free Press

He calls it “the Uber of homicide.”

Western University criminology professor Michael Arntfield is referring to an algorithm that’s been developed by the Murder Accountability Project he says has the potential to solve many unsolved murders in the United States and to identify serial killers.

Now, he’d like to see that problem-solving model adopted in Canada to solve murders at home.

“It’s disruptive digital innovation changing a system where the status quo has prevailed for over a century,” he said.

Arntfield is a director of the international non-profit group that operates on donations and research grants and is making a splash with major law enforcement organizations, as ride-sharing upstart Uber did in the taxi industry, with a new approach to an old way of doing things.

“My current work is now trying to build this in Canada,” Arntfield said or the homicide database that’s already led to at least one arrest.

It’s been a busy week

Read more at: http://www.lfpress.com/2018/02/04/western-university-prof-touts-homicide-tracking-algorithm

Western University professor touts homicide tracking algorithm

He calls it “the Uber of homicide.”

Western University criminology professor Michael Arntfield is referring to an algorithm that’s been developed by the Murder Accountability Project he says has the potential to solve many unsolved murders in the United States and to identify serial killers.

Now, he’d like to see that problem-solving model adopted in Canada to solve murders at home.

“It’s disruptive digital innovation changing a system where the status quo has prevailed for over a century,” he said.

Arntfield is a director of the international non-profit group that operates on donations and research grants and is making a splash with major law enforcement organizations, as ride-sharing upstart Uber did in the taxi industry, with a new approach to an old way of doing things.

“My current work is now trying to build this in Canada,” Arntfield said or the homicide database that’s already led to at least one arrest.

It’s been a busy week

Read more at: http://www.lfpress.com/2018/02/04/western-university-prof-touts-homicide-tracking-algorithm

Western University prof touts homicide tracking algorithm

He calls it “the Uber of homicide.”

Western University criminology professor Michael Arntfield is referring to an algorithm that’s been developed by the Murder Accountability Project he says has the potential to solve many unsolved murders in the United States and to identify serial killers.

Now, he’d like to see that problem-solving model adopted in Canada to solve murders at home.

“It’s disruptive digital innovation changing a system where the status quo has prevailed for over a century,” he said.

Arntfield is a director of the international non-profit group that operates on donations and research grants and is making a splash with major law enforcement organizations, as ride-sharing upstart Uber did in the taxi industry, with a new approach to an old way of doing things.

“My current work is now trying to build this in Canada,” Arntfield said or the homicide database that’s already led to at least one arrest.

It’s been a busy week

Read more at: http://www.lfpress.com/2018/02/04/western-university-prof-touts-homicide-tracking-algorithm

Western University prof touts homicide tracking algorithm

He calls it “the Uber of homicide.”

Western University criminology professor Michael Arntfield is referring to an algorithm that’s been developed by the Murder Accountability Project he says has the potential to solve many unsolved murders in the United States and to identify serial killers.

Now, he’d like to see that problem-solving model adopted in Canada to solve murders at home.

“It’s disruptive digital innovation changing a system where the status quo has prevailed for over a century,” he said.

Arntfield is a director of the international non-profit group that operates on donations and research grants and is making a splash with major law enforcement organizations, as ride-sharing upstart Uber did in the taxi industry, with a new approach to an old way of doing things.

“My current work is now trying to build this in Canada,” Arntfield said or the homicide database that’s already led to at least one arrest.

It’s been a busy week

Read more at: http://www.stratfordbeaconherald.com/2018/02/04/western-university-prof-touts-homicide-tracking-algorithm

Western prof: Toronto serial killings indicate flawed police practices

A Western University prof says the recent Toronto serial killings point to system issues with Canadian police forces.

On Jan. 18, Bruce McArthur was arrested for a string of murders that targeted men in Toronto’s Gay Village over the last eight years. As of right now, McArthur is charged with five counts of first-degree murder dating back to 2010.

While the case is shocking to most, it didn’t come as a surprise to Michael Arntfield, a leading criminologist and professor at Western.

Arntfield is the founder of Western’s Cold Case Society, a collective of students that use emerging investigative practices to analyze evidence from unsolved homicide cases. Relying on algorithms, analysis and critical interpretations of data, the Cold Case Society finds the patterns in homicide cases that may go undetected by police departments.

Students from Arntfield’s Cold Case Society first brought the Toronto murders to his attention roughly three years ago. While the society never

Read more at: https://www.westerngazette.ca/culture/western-prof-toronto-serial-killings-indicate-flawed-police-practices/article_4c307a3c-06eb-11e8-b7e3-d70082399ab7.html