Category Archives: National Missing and Unidentified Persons System

VANISHED: Recent TN law could breathe new life into old missing persons cases

MEMPHIS, Tenn — Where is Ricarda Tillman-Locket? The young wife and mother disappeared 11 years ago leaving her family, a community and police searching for the answer to that question.

However, WREG has uncovered details about a tool that is open to both the public and law enforcement that could help solve cases like Locket’s, except we learned it hardly being used.

A new Tennessee law could change that, and possibly lead to closure for families with missing loved ones.

Across the country there are some 85,000 active missing person cases.

Richenda Pritchard’s niece, Richarda Tillman-Lockett, was reported missing Feb. 19, 2007.

“You don’t know what happened to them…you don’t know where they are. You don’t know if they’re alive. You don’t know if they’re dead,” said Lieutenant Cindy Capps of the Memphis Police Department.

Tillman-Lockett reportedly left work but never picked up her young

Read more at: http://wreg.com/2018/02/19/vanished-recent-tn-law-could-breathe-new-life-into-old-missing-persons-cases/

Using DNA to find the missing

NEW YORK – For families who have searched years for missing loved ones, donating a sample of their DNA is often a last, desperate act to confirm their worst fears.

New York City’s medical examiner is leading a nationwide effort to collect genetic material and match it with unidentified human remains. It’s a way to finally give family members some answers and maybe some solace.

“People will not rest without answers, at least some answers,” said Dr. Barbara Sampson, the city’s chief medical examiner.

In the past decade, thousands of DNA samples have been donated to the

Read more at: http://www.jacksonsun.com/story/news/2018/02/19/using-dna-find-missing/110607182/

Using DNA to find the missing – The Jackson Sun

NEW YORK – For families who have searched years for missing loved ones, donating a sample of their DNA is often a last, desperate act to confirm their worst fears.

New York City’s medical examiner is leading a nationwide effort to collect genetic material and match it with unidentified human remains. It’s a way to finally give family members some answers and maybe some solace.

“People will not rest without answers, at least some answers,” said Dr. Barbara Sampson, the city’s chief medical examiner.

In the past decade, thousands of DNA samples have been donated to the

Read more at: http://www.jacksonsun.com/story/news/2018/02/19/using-dna-find-missing/110607182/

Kentucky man masterminded delivery of illegal recruits to school, lawsuit alleges

A civil lawsuit filed in Pike Circuit Court by the former assistant principal and boys basketball coach of Pike Central High School has revealed details of alleged recruiting being orchestrated by a local business owner. The filing has helped to shed light on allegations of recruiting and placement of high school basketball players by Kentucky BCI Basketball owner David Clevenger, of Brushy Road in Varney.

For this story, the News-Express attempted to reach Clevenger at a number provided for Kentucky BCI Basketball without success. Additionally, school officials were not made available to speak with the News-Express due to the ongoing whistleblower lawsuit.

According to the lawsuit filed by Keith May, former assistant principal and basketball coach for the Pike Central Hawks, his reporting of violations to his superiors led, first, to his not being retained as the basketball coach and, then, him not being retained as assistant principal for

Read more at: http://www.kentucky.com/sports/high-school/prep-basketball/article200917974.html

Medical examiner taps DNA science to find missing persons – Lockport Union

 

NEW YORK — For families who have searched years for missing loved ones, donating a sample of their DNA is often a last, desperate act to confirm their worst fears.

New York City’s medical examiner is leading a nationwide effort to collect genetic material and match it with unidentified human remains. It’s a way to finally give family members some answers and maybe some solace.

“People will not rest without answers, at least some answers,” said Dr. Barbara Sampson, the city’s chief medical examiner.

Over the last decade, thousands of DNA samples have been donated to the city’s medical examiner’s office. Most include swabs of saliva from close relatives, but also DNA taken from items used by the missing persons themselves, including toothbrushes, combs, razor blades and, once, even a sanitary napkin.

They’ve led to the identification of about 50 missing people each year, all of whom had been found dead. But for many

Read more at: http://www.lockportjournal.com/news/medical-examiner-taps-dna-science-to-find-missing-persons/article_a6df6aa1-01e2-5e52-ab89-73e12e62b400.html

National effort uses DNA to identify missing people

New York – For families who have searched years for missing loved ones, donating a sample of their DNA is often a last, desperate act to confirm their worst fears.

New York City’s medical examiner is leading a nationwide effort to collect genetic material and match it with unidentified human remains. It’s a way to finally give family members some answers and maybe some solace.

“People will not rest without answers, at least some answers,” said Dr. Barbara Sampson, the city’s chief medical examiner.

Over the last decade, thousands of DNA samples have been donated to the city’s medical examiner’s office.

Most include swabs of saliva from close relatives, but also DNA taken from items

Read more at: http://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/nation/2018/02/18/dna-missing-persons/110584192/

Medical examiner taps DNA science to find missing persons | The …

For families who have searched years for missing loved ones, donating a sample of their DNA is often a last, desperate act to confirm their worst fears.

New York City’s medical examiner is leading a nationwide effort to collect genetic material and match it with unidentified human remains. It’s a way to finally give family members some answers and maybe some solace.

“People will not rest without answers, at least some answers,” said Dr. Barbara Sampson, the city’s chief medical examiner.

Over the last decade, thousands of DNA samples have been donated to the city’s medical examiner’s office. Most include swabs of saliva from close relatives, but also DNA taken from items used by the missing persons themselves, including toothbrushes, combs, razor blades and, once, even a sanitary napkin.

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They’ve led to the identification of

Read more at: https://www.kansas.com/news/business/article200810324.html

Medical examiner taps DNA science to find missing persons

For families who have searched years for missing loved ones, donating a sample of their DNA is often a last, desperate act to confirm their worst fears.

New York City’s medical examiner is leading a nationwide effort to collect genetic material and match it with unidentified human remains. It’s a way to finally give family members some answers and maybe some solace.

“People will not rest without answers, at least some answers,” said Dr. Barbara Sampson, the city’s chief medical examiner.

Over the last decade, thousands of DNA samples have been donated to the city’s medical examiner’s office. Most include swabs of saliva from close relatives, but also DNA taken from items used by the missing persons themselves, including toothbrushes, combs, razor blades and, once, even a sanitary napkin.

Never miss a local story.

Sign up today for a free 30 day free trial of unlimited digital access.

They’ve led to the identification of

Read more at: http://www.newsobserver.com/news/business/article200810324.html

Medical examiner taps DNA science to find missing persons

NEW YORK (AP) — For families who have searched years for missing loved ones, donating a sample of their DNA is often a last, desperate act to confirm their worst fears.

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New York City’s medical examiner is leading a nationwide effort to collect genetic material and match it with unidentified human remains. It’s a way to finally give family members some answers and maybe some solace.

“People will not rest without answers, at least some answers,” said Dr. Barbara Sampson, the city’s chief medical examiner.

Over the last decade, thousands of DNA samples have been donated to the city’s medical examiner’s office. Most include swabs of saliva from close relatives, but also DNA taken from items used by the missing persons themselves, including toothbrushes, combs, razor blades and, once, even a sanitary napkin.

They’ve led to the identification of about 50 missing people each year, all of whom had been found dead.

Read more at: http://www.foxbusiness.com/features/2018/02/18/medical-examiner-taps-dna-science-to-find-missing-persons.html