Category Archives: Satellite Archaeology

UNH Researchers Find Human Impact on Forest Still Evident After 500 Years

 

UNH Researchers Find Human Impact on Forest Still Evident After 500 Years

Newswise — DURHAM, N.H. – Tropical forests span a huge area, harbor a wide diversity of species, and are important to water and nutrient cycling on a planet scale. But in ancient Amazonia, over 500 years ago, clearing tropical forests was a way of survival to provide land for families to farm and villages to prosper. Researchers at the University of New Hampshire used high-tech tools to more precisely view where these cleared sites were and how much lasting impact they had on the rainforest in the Amazon Basin in South America.

“One of the key mysteries in this area of the world is that no one knows how many people lived in Amazonia before European contact,” said Michael Palace, an associate professor in the Earth Sciences Department and Earth Systems Research Center at UNH. “Once the Europeans arrived,

Read more at: http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/688110/?sc=rssn

History’s Lost Transoceanic Voyages: Tamils and Sumerians Among the FIRST to Reach Australia and Antarctica …

Regarding interesting inscriptions and shapes found by satellite archaeology, revealing what might be ancient human occupation on the continent of Antarctica, author William James Veall writes that epigrapher, educator and anthropologist, Dr Clyde Winters, Ph.D. was of the opinion: “ I have looked at the inscriptions from Australia and they appear to be written in TAMIL.”

[Read Part 1]

Plate 5. (Courtesy author)

Plate 5. (Courtesy author)

On Plate 5, Dr Winters wrote: “It was unlikely that there was any connection between Hanuman and the Indus Valley, because monkey figures do not appear on Indus Valley seals.”

He further stated, “I believe this is a human figure. It would appear that these heads are leaders from various Sumerian centers that formerly existed on Antarctica.”

 “These people were probably from the Sumerian colony in South America, called Kuga Ki.” 
“The Marambio

Read more at: http://www.ancient-origins.net/history-s-lost-transoceanic-voyages-tamils-and-sumerians-among-first-reach-australia-and-antarctica-021744

Tamils and Sumerians Among the FIRST to Reach Australia and Antarctica? PART I

Guest Author, Satellite Archaeologist, and Independent Researcher, William James Veall updates his recently published article on “Antarctica Writings” on Ancient Origins , to include an alternative perspective by epigrapher, educator and anthropologist, Dr Clyde Winters , Ph.D. Chicago, USA, concerning the identification and transliteration of the inscriptive material.

Before commencing, a brief summary of the back-ground history of the Tamils and their script together with the Sumerians, and what is meant by a ‘Linear Sumerian script’.

The Tamils

Nothing is really certain about the Tamil people’s history. They lived in a southern part of India called Tamil Nadu, circa 2200 BC, then migrated mainly into the northeastern areas of Sri Lanka, which became the permanent homeland of the Sri Lankan Tamils around the second century BC.

The Tamil script evolved from an ancient southern form of Brahmi script, circa 2200 BC, with literature emerging circa 300

Read more at: http://www.ancient-origins.net/ancient-places-australia-oceania/tamils-and-sumerians-among-first-reach-australia-and-antarctica-021743

David Icke

At Ancient Origins, we believe that one of the most important fields of knowledge we can pursue as human beings is our beginnings. And while some people may seem content with the story as it stands, our view is that there exists countless mysteries, scientific anomalies and surprising artifacts that have yet to be discovered and explained.

The goal of Ancient Origins is to highlight recent archaeological discoveries, peer-reviewed academic research and evidence, as well as offering alternative viewpoints and explanations of science, archaeology, mythology, religion and history around the globe.

We’re the only Pop Archaeology site combining scientific research with out-of-the-box perspectives.

By bringing together top experts and authors, this archaeology website explores lost civilizations, examines sacred writings, tours ancient places, investigates ancient discoveries and questions mysterious happenings. Our open community is dedicated to digging into the origins of our species on planet earth, and question wherever the discoveries might take us. We seek to retell the

Read more at: http://www.ancient-origins.net/users/david-icke

Iraqi Kurdistan’s archaeological hotspots revived, but vulnerable

The Kurdish region is full of untapped secrets and treasures, say scientists.
© John MacGinnis

In late October, University of Tübingen archaeologists working in the Kurdish region of Iraq discovered a cuneiform archive of 93 clay tablets belonging to the Middle Assyrian Empire and dating from 1250 BCE. It was an exciting find since cuneiform script, invented by the Sumerians in ancient Mesopotamia around 3500 BCE, is among the world’s earliest systems of writing. 

The Tübingen researchers, led by professor Peter Pfälzner, have been working with the Duhok Antiquities Directorate at the Bronze Age city site of Bassetki, where the tablets were unearthed. The recent find, says Pfälzner, provides evidence Bassetki was inhabited almost continuously between approximately 3000 and

Read more at: https://www.natureasia.com/en/nmiddleeast/article/10.1038/nmiddleeast.2017.160

Jonny Enoch

At Ancient Origins, we believe that one of the most important fields of knowledge we can pursue as human beings is our beginnings. And while some people may seem content with the story as it stands, our view is that there exists countless mysteries, scientific anomalies and surprising artifacts that have yet to be discovered and explained.

The goal of Ancient Origins is to highlight recent archaeological discoveries, peer-reviewed academic research and evidence, as well as offering alternative viewpoints and explanations of science, archaeology, mythology, religion and history around the globe.

We’re the only Pop Archaeology site combining scientific research with out-of-the-box perspectives.

By bringing together top experts and authors, this archaeology website explores lost civilizations, examines sacred writings, tours ancient places, investigates ancient discoveries and questions mysterious happenings. Our open community is dedicated to digging into the origins of our species on planet earth, and question wherever the discoveries might take us. We seek to retell the

Read more at: http://www.ancient-origins.net/users/jonny-enoch

4000-Year-Old Pyramid Peak Discovered at Long-Lost Burial Site of 6th Dynasty Egyptian Queen

The peak of a pyramid, dating back to around 2,000 BC, has been unearthed at the long-lost burial site of Ankhnespepy II, an important Egyptian queen of the 6 th dynasty.  The rest of the pyramid is yet to be discovered.

Egypt’s Ministry of Antiquities announced that the top of the pyramid, known as a pyramidion, was discovered at the funerary complex of Queen Ankhnespepy II at Saqqara necropolis, located about 30km (19mi) south of Cairo.

Archaeologists carrying out excavations at the Saqqara necropolis. Credit: Smithsonian

Archaeologists carrying out excavations at the Saqqara necropolis. Credit: Smithsonian

“We think that it is the pyramidion of the satellite pyramid of Queen Ankhnespepy II, as it was found near the place where we should expect the satellite pyramid to have been located,” Professor Philippe Collombert, head of the Swiss-French archaeological mission, told Read more at: http://www.ancient-origins.net/news-history-archaeology/4000-year-old-pyramid-peak-discovered-long-lost-burial-site-6th-dynasty-021659

Archaeologists Announce that New Discoveries Solve Mystery of How the Great Pyramid Was Built

A new set of investigations in ancient Egypt have led to some startling discoveries – the translation of an ancient papyrus, the unearthing of an ingenious system of waterworks, and the discovery of a 4,500-year-old ceremonial boat – may be the final pieces to the millennia-old puzzle of how the Great Pyramid of Egypt was really built.

Archaeologists have reported their incredible new findings to  Mail Online , which will be reported in full in tonight’s Channel 4 documentary ‘Egypt’s Great Pyramid: The New Evidence’ in the United Kingdom.  

Despite centuries of research into the pyramids of Giza, there has still been no definitive explanation as to how the ancient Egyptians cut, transported, and assembled millions of limestone and granite blocks, each weighing an average of 2.3 metric tons. “For the construction of the pyramids, there is no single theory that is 100% proven or checked; They are all

Read more at: http://www.ancient-origins.net/news-history-archaeology/archaeologists-announce-new-discoveries-solve-mystery-how-great-pyramid-was-021628

Satnews Daily

This professor of anthropology comments on the ethics and future trajectory of space archaeology in the region of the Middle East.

For almost 20 years, Sarah Parcak, professor of anthropology at the University of Alabama, Birmingham, has combed through satellite images of Egypt and the Middle East to find clues to ancient landscapes. 


Courtesy of Sarah Parcak

Parcak’s resume is impressive. She won the $1 million 2016 TED prize, has written a seminal textbook on satellite archaeology, as well as numerous other scholarly publications on the topic. 

She’s also the director of the Joint Lisht Mission with Egypt’s Ministry of Antiquities, excavating the extensive ancient cemetery and Middle-Kingdom pyramids of Lisht, 65km south of Cairo. 

Nature Middle East asks Parcak about her expertise with satellite archaeology in the region.

What is satellite archaeology or space archaeology?

It is remote sensing using both airborne and space platforms as different ways to look at the

Read more at: http://www.satnews.com/story.php?number=2114487157

What lies beneath: Satellite archaeology in the Middle East

Courtesy of Sarah Parcak

For almost 20 years, Sarah Parcak, professor of anthropology at the University of Alabama, Birmingham, has combed through satellite images of Egypt and the Middle East to find clues to ancient landscapes. 

Parcak’s resume is impressive. She won the $1 million 2016 TED prize, has written a seminal textbook on satellite archaeology, as well as numerous other scholarly publications on the topic. 

She’s also the director of the Joint Lisht Mission with Egypt’s Ministry of Antiquities, excavating the extensive ancient cemetery and Middle-Kingdom pyramids of Lisht, 65km south of Cairo. 

Nature Middle East asks Parcak about her expertise with satellite archaeology in the region.

What is satellite archaeology or space archaeology?

It is remote sensing using both airborne and space platforms as different ways to look at the Earth’s surface for things

Read more at: http://www.natureasia.com/en/nmiddleeast/article/10.1038/nmiddleeast.2017.132