Tag Archives: america

America’s Clean Energy Success, by the Numbers

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Over the past eight years, the United States has experienced a remarkable explosion of innovation and entrepreneurship in clean energy. The U.S. energy sector has steadily transformed to a cleaner one with electricity production from wind quadrupling and utility-scale solar electric generation increasing 40-fold. Throughout this transformation, the energy sector has maintained affordability and reliability and supported clean energy jobs for millions of Americans. The clean energy sector will continue to build on this foundation, given the powerful forces of technological innovation, ever-lower costs, and broad business and public support that have coalesced around clean energy.

Since taking office, however, President Donald Trump and his administration have set in motion numerous efforts to dismantle the clean energy growth engine. The Trump administration’s budget, for example, starves support for continued clean-energy innovation and its regulatory agenda undermines energy efficiency initiatives and

Read more at: https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/green/reports/2017/06/29/435281/americas-clean-energy-success-numbers/

Voices of America


Americans, of course, have been listening to the radio for more than a hundred years. But radio is different: Beamed out to a broad audience whose choices in programming are limited by their physical location and the time of day they tune in, radio aimed from the start to reach anyone and everyone who happened to be listening. It couldn’t be too weird or off-kilter; it couldn’t be about individual obsession. It had to be about the shared stuff of public life.

No longer. If you care about a subject, there’s a podcast for it. There’s a podcast called Silage Talk, which is produced by Dairy Herd Management magazine. (“We’re kicking off a great new conversation about silage,” the

Read more at: https://newrepublic.com/article/140976/voices-america-podcasts-stories-individual-obsession

The Lawyer Burying America’s “Living Dead”

One morning in the fall of 2013, Ignacio Jimenez said goodbye to his family and left their home in Sierra Vista, Ariz. He would never be heard from again.

At the time, the family had been suffering through a rough patch financially. Ignacio, 31, had been furloughed from his full-time job, through a government contractor, as a plumber at Fort Huachuca, a U.S. Army installation in southeast Arizona. He and his wife, Alicia, had six children. Without his paycheck, they quickly fell behind on their mortgage payments.

To stave off foreclosure, Alicia would later testify in court, her husband came up with an ill-fated plan: He would earn some quick cash driving a childhood friend back and forth across the nearby border with Mexico. The details were hazy. Years later in court, Ignacio’s father would testify that he believed his son was helping to smuggle drugs.

Read more at: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2017-03-27/the-lawyer-burying-america-s-living-dead

The Lawyer Burying America’s ‘Living Dead’ – Bloomberg

One morning in the fall of 2013, Ignacio Jimenez said goodbye to his family and left their home in Sierra Vista, Ariz. He would never be heard from again.

At the time, the family had been suffering through a rough patch financially. Ignacio, 31, had been furloughed from his full-time job, through a government contractor, as a plumber at Fort Huachuca, a U.S. Army installation in southeast Arizona. He and his wife, Alicia, had six children. Without his paycheck, they quickly fell behind on their mortgage payments.

To stave off foreclosure, Alicia would later testify in court, her husband came up with an ill-fated plan: He would earn some quick cash driving a childhood friend back and forth across the nearby border with Mexico. The details were hazy. Years later in court, Ignacio’s father would testify that he believed his son was helping to smuggle drugs.

Read more at: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2017-03-27/the-lawyer-burying-america-s-living-dead

How Amateur Sleuths Are Solving America’s Coldest Cases

Mary Roach meets C.S.I. in this “lively study that’s part whodunit, part sociological study…The result is eminently entertaining and will be devoured by armchair detectives” (Publishers Weekly).

Currently, upwards of forty thousand people in America are dead and unaccounted for. These murder, suicide, and accident victims, separated from their names, are being adopted by the bizarre online world of amateur sleuths. It’s DIY CSI, solving cold cases from the comfort of your living room…

In an “absorbing look at a very odd corner of our world” (The Seattle Times), The Skeleton Crew: How Amateur Sleuths Are Solving America’s Coldest Cases provides an entree into the gritty and tumultuous world of Sherlock Holmes–wannabes who race to beat out law enforcement—and one another—at matching missing persons with unidentified remains. These web sleuths pore over facial reconstructions (a sort of Facebook for the dead) and other online clues as they vie to solve cold cases and tally up personal scorecards of dead bodies.

There is “no better guide for navigating this multifaceted world than Deborah Halber’s book” (Psychology Today), and The Skeleton Crew probes the macabre underside of the Internet and how even the most ordinary citizen with a laptop and a knack for puzzles can reinvent herself as a web sleuth. “Engaging and artful” (Los Angeles Times Review of Books), this witty and insightful look at the fleeting nature of identity is “brilliant” (The Wall Street Journal).

‘America’s silent disaster:’ Mysteries of the missing

FBI: More than 1,100 ‘active’ missing-persons cases in Tennessee; exact number unknown

By Jim Balloch

In the early-morning hours of April 26, Megan Maxwell drove to her father’s home in Newport to check on him. From there, at 4:27 a.m., she called a friend to say all was OK and she would return home after finishing a cigarette.

About 90 minutes later, Newport Police Officer Derek Wright headed home after working a night shift. He came upon a car fully engulfed in flames on Highway 25/70 about six miles east of town.

The red 2001 Mitsubishi was

Read more at: http://www.knoxnews.com/news/local/americas-silent-disaster-mysteries-of-the-missing-ep-409881561-359337761.html

FBI Most Wanted List: 65 Years Of Successfully Capturing America’s Most Dangerous Criminals

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Most Wanted list is celebrating 65-years of successfully capturing the most hideous criminals in America’s history.

Notorious FBI director J. Edgar Hoover instituted the most wanted list in 1950, after a reporter asked the bureau to provide a list of names and descriptions of the “toughest guys” that the agency wanted to capture. After the public showed intense interest in the resulting story, Hoover decided to act and publish a formal list.

Since its inception, the FBI most wanted list has featured 504 fugitives from the law — eight of whom are women — with 473 (94 percent) captured or located. Out of that number, 155 (31 percent) have been found with the public’s assistance, a key element of the list.

Leslie Isben Rogge, captured in 1996
Leslie

Read more at: http://www.inquisitr.com/1921452/fbi-most-wanted-list-65-years-of-successfully-capturing-americas-most-dangerous-criminals/