Tag Archives: american

‘American Vandal’ Creators on ‘Love’ of True Crime Docs and Going Beyond Dick Jokes

With the launch of “American Vandal” on Netflix in September, the dicks that sprang from the minds of series creators Dan Perrault and Tony Yacenda were on the lips of America for weeks.

The eight-episode mockumentary series explores the aftermath of an act of vandalism at a California high school in which penises were spray-painted on over two dozen faculty cars. The blame eventually falls on senior Dylan Maxwell (Jimmy Tatro), who is promptly expelled and faces felony charges for the crime. But a fellow student and aspiring documentarian decides to give the evidence another look, discovering deep — and often hilarious — secrets that shake the school to its core.

What might have been written off as a one-note punchline — “Who drew the dicks?” — proved detractors wrong. The show — produced by Funny or Die, 3 Arts Entertainment, and CBS Television Studios — not

Read more at: http://variety.com/2018/tv/news/american-vandal-creators-tony-yacenda-dan-perrault-1202646830/

We Have Set Up a System to Sex Traffic American Children

Senator Rob Portman (R-Ohio) introduced legislation in 2017 to amend an antiquated 1996 law that was ostensibly enacted to protect freedom of expression on the Internet, but, as Sen. Portman’s bill describes, allowed website operators (most prominently, Backpage ) to facilitate the sale of sex with victims of sex trafficking. In many of these cases, the victims are children.

The frequency of child sex abuse is a true epidemic. Since at least 2000, the U.S. Department of Justice has reported that some 67 percent of all sexual assaults are committed against victims under 18 years old.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reports confirmed child sexual abuse cases number approximately 58,000 per year in recent years.

Unreported child sexual assaults are estimated at 80

Read more at: http://www.newsweek.com/we-have-set-system-sex-traffic-american-children-779541

Netflix hit ‘American Vandal’ to shoot Season 2 in Portland; casting call Jan. 6

“American Vandal,” the Netflix true-crime parody about a case of male genitalia vandalism, is coming back for a second season. And this one is going to shoot in Portland.

In case you haven’t watched it yet, the first season of “American Vandal” is a satirical spin on such who-done-it series Netflix’s “Making a Murderer” and public radio’s “Serial.” But the crime in “American Vandal” isn’t grim, it’s goofy — i.e., who painted images of penises on a bunch of high school faculty cars?

“American Vandal,” created by Tony Yacenda and Dan Perrault, who were joined by showrunner Dan Lagana, became a hit for Netflix after it began streaming, on Sept. 15. Vanity Fair called it “Netflix’s Best New Show.”

Appearing at the Vulture Festival in Los Angeles, Yacenda, Perrault and Lagana shared a few tidbits about what to expect in Season 2.

From an IndieWire report on the event:

“Yacenda, Perrault,

Read more at: http://www.oregonlive.com/tv/2018/01/netflix_hit_american_vandal_to.html

Netflix hit ‘American Vandal’ to shoot Season 2 in Portland; casting …

“American Vandal,” the Netflix true-crime parody about a case of male genitalia vandalism, is coming back for a second season. And this one is going to shoot in Portland.

In case you haven’t watched it yet, the first season of “American Vandal” is a satirical spin on such who-done-it series Netflix’s “Making a Murderer” and public radio’s “Serial.” But the crime in “American Vandal” isn’t grim, it’s goofy — i.e., who painted images of penises on a bunch of high school faculty cars?

“American Vandal,” created by Tony Yacenda and Dan Perrault, who were joined by showrunner Dan Lagana, became a hit for Netflix after it began streaming, on Sept. 15. Vanity Fair called it “Netflix’s Best New Show.”

Appearing at the Vulture Festival in Los Angeles, Yacenda, Perrault and Lagana shared a few tidbits about what to expect in Season 2.

From an IndieWire report on the event:

“Yacenda, Perrault,

Read more at: http://www.oregonlive.com/tv/2018/01/netflix_hit_american_vandal_to.html

“American Vandal” and Our Search for Meaning

There may be no genre of television easier to parody than true crime. The style is formulaic by design: an atrocity is followed by an investigation, a left turn, a revelation, fin. Think “America’s Most Wanted,” or “Dateline.” Fictionalized variations of the idea, in which a crime is committed, scrutinized, and solved within the hour, are called procedurals for good reason. The accoutrements (plastic evidence bags, grainy security footage, an incriminating fibre tweezed from a corpse) are consistent from episode to episode, and the action unfolds in the same way each time. True crime allows for more uncertainty—sometimes the wrong man is fingered—but the sight of a perpetrator being hustled off in handcuffs remains satisfying, because we knew it was coming, and because it signals the deliverance of justice. Bad things happen, but not without consequences.

Don’t End 2017 Without Watching ‘American Vandal’

I didn’t see it coming. I was caught by surprise. This was the true twist awaiting me during my post-Thanksgiving binge of American Vandal. Three hours deep, I asked myself with stone cold seriousness and not a hint of irony: “Who really drew the dicks?” That’s when I understood the power of American Vandal, a show I confidently consider to be a modern classic.

Let this be your final warning before the year is over: You need to watch American Vandal. Stop whatever else it is you’re watching, even if it’s The Crown or The Good Place. Watch American Vandal. At eight episodes and a breezy 48-ish minutes apiece, you can start and finish 2017’s best show in one emotional roller coaster ride. You’ll be happy you did.

A scripted comedy masked as an eight-part “documentary,” American Vandal, from showrunners Dan Perrault

Read more at: https://www.inverse.com/article/39374-netflix-binge-american-vandal-best-comedy

In Praise of ‘American Vandal’: TV’s Sleeper Hit of the Year

Streaming services like Netflix often tend to work on a model which favors hype following instead of leading – for every Marvel property or proven commodity like Black Mirror that’s preceded by a blitz of hype, there are dozens of series that get released with little fanfare, banking on big leaps of faith that the right folks will find it. (Remember how little advance buzz accompanied Stranger Things before that first weekend turned it into a phenomenon?) Still, on paper, a true-crime satire that harnessed the appeal of both 13 Reasons Why and Making a Murderer sounds like the kind of sure thing that would get a major marketing rollout. Which is why you’d have thought that Netflix would have turned the premiere of American Vandal, Tony Yacenda and Dan Perrault’s parody of modern investigative vérité set in a high school, into a major stop-the-presses event. 

How ‘Search Party’ and ‘American Vandal’ Nail Millennials – The …

In the second episode of the first season of the TBS show Search Party, someone a little bit older than our protagonist, Dory, asks her a terrifying question: “What do you do?” Knowing how much weight the answer to that question is supposed to carry — how succinctly it is supposed to sum up her entire identity — she looks down at the lid of her deli coffee cup and grasps for a few words that do not sound totally pathetic. “I, uh, work as an assistant … to a lady who’s … married,” Dory (Alia Shawkat) stammers, then lets it go with a sigh. “It’s pretty meaningless. I’m just tired of things that don’t matter.”

Search Party — which returns to TBS this Sunday for a triumphantly ante-upped second season — was one of the best new shows of last year, and, perhaps more than any television show since Girls, you could hardly read a headline

Read more at: https://www.theringer.com/tv/2017/11/17/16669714/millennial-shows-search-party-american-vandal

Back to school with American Vandal

A scene from American Vandal.

When I first came across American Vandal — the mockumentary series recently released on Netflix — my first impression of the show was that it felt like an over-elaborate penis joke.

Told in a docudrama style clearly derived from true-crime shows like Netflix’s own Making A Murderer, American Vandal centres on high-school doofus Dylan Maxwell (Jimmy Tatro), who stands accused of spray-painting male genitalia on dozens of cars in his school’s staff parking lot. Dylan vehemently insists on his own innocence, prompting Peter Maldonado (Tyler Alvarez) — a fellow member of his school’s TV-production club — to launch an investigation into the many discrepancies in the school board’s case against Dylan.

As you may infer from the show’s premise, its high-school setting, the fact that it’s being produced under the Funny or Die label or even its tagline — “Who Drew The Dicks?” — Read more at: https://www.bangkokpost.com/lifestyle/film/1358091/back-to-school-with-american-vandal