Tag Archives: innocence

Innocence Project Says DOJ is Turning Dangerously Away From Ensuring that Forensic Testimony is Guided by …

Fifty-five-year-old Jimmy Genrich of Grand Junction, Colorado, has been in prison for nearly 25 years for series of bombings he has long said he did not commit. His conviction for the bombings that terrified residents of Grand Junction was based primarily on something called explosives toolmark analysis, a pattern-matching process akin to the controversial art of bite mark analysis, which provided the only physical evidence connecting Genrich to the crimes.

In a deeply-researched longread for the The Nation, Meehan Crist and Tim Requarth wrote about Genrich’s case, which has been taken up by the Innocence Project. In the course of their research, the reporters examined thousands of pages of trial transcripts, and interviewed dozens of prosecutors, defense attorneys, and scientists, which let them to conclude there was “a startling lack of scientific support for forensic pattern-matching techniques such as toolmark analysis,” that our legal system “has failed to

Read more at: http://witnessla.com/innocence-project-says-doj-is-turning-dangerously-away-from-ensuring-that-forensic-testimony-is-guided-by-science-not-law-enforcement-prosecutors/

Illinois Innocence Project Clears Man Once Accused Of 1995 Fatal Arson

An Illinois man was found “not guilty” today for an arson case dating back to 1995. Bill Amor already spent 22 years in prison for a crime he says he didn’t commit.

Amor lived in Naperville in an apartment he shared with his wife and her mother. A fire at that apartment  in 1995 killed his mother-in-law.  Amor says he was at a movie with his wife when the fire broke out. Law enforcement at the time immediately pinned Amor as a suspect.

He spent two weeks in jail and after hours of grueling questioning, he gave in and offered a false confession. That’s what a lawyer for the Illinois Innocence Project, Lauren Kaeseberg, says.

“Bill wanted to make the questioning stop, which is the phenomena we see with false confessions,” she said. “He presumably thought this would all work itself out later. He was psychologically traumatized.”

Kaeseberg

Read more at: http://peoriapublicradio.org/post/illinois-innocence-project-clears-man-once-accused-1995-fatal-arson

Illinois Innocence Project Clears Man Once Accused Of 1995 Fatal …

An Illinois man was found “not guilty” today for an arson case dating back to 1995. Bill Amor already spent 22 years in prison for a crime he says he didn’t commit.

Amor lived in Naperville in an apartment he shared with his wife and her mother. A fire at that apartment  in 1995 killed his mother-in-law.  Amor says he was at a movie with his wife when the fire broke out. Law enforcement at the time immediately pinned Amor as a suspect.

He spent two weeks in jail and after hours of grueling questioning, he gave in and offered a false confession. That’s what a lawyer for the Illinois Innocence Project, Lauren Kaeseberg, says.

“Bill wanted to make the questioning stop, which is the phenomena we see with false confessions,” she said. “He presumably thought this would all work itself out later. He was psychologically traumatized.”

Kaeseberg

Read more at: http://peoriapublicradio.org/post/illinois-innocence-project-clears-man-once-accused-1995-fatal-arson

The Irish Innocence project: how American lawyers helped bring justice to Northern Ireland

The Lawyers Alliance for Justice in Ireland came to Ireland to express solidarity with our brothers and sisters at the Bar whom we perceived to be on the front lines of justice.

“Better to Light One Candle Than to Curse the Darkness”

From February 1992 through the end of 2002, more than 125 American lawyers, judges, professors, law students and activists traveled to Northern Ireland, at their own expense, to observe Diplock Court trials, cooperate with Irish and British lawyers, meet with judges, including Lord Chief Justices, visit prisons and community centers and participate in community justice inquiries.

Why did we come, what did we do and what did we find?

Why the Irish Innocence project came to Northern Ireland

Pat Finucane.

Pat Finucane.

American lawyers came to Ireland to express solidarity with our brothers and sisters at the Bar whom we perceived to be on the front

Read more at: https://www.irishcentral.com/news/thenorth/irish-innocence-project-american-lawyers-justice-northern-ireland

Wisconsin Innocence Project moves for new trial in shaken-baby homicide case Motion claims Decatur man received …

By Ryan Broege, Editor –

The Wisconsin Innocence Project has filed for a motion to re-open the case against Casey Shelton, who was convicted of first-degree reckless homicide in the death of his twin son Christopher.

A jury convicted Casey Shelton of first-degree reckless homicide on Jan. 17, 2009, and Green County Judge Thomas Vale sentenced him to 40 years imprisonment and 10 years extended supervision.

Pick up this week’s print edition for full story….

Read more at: http://indreg.com/?p=5121

From the Perspective of an Innocence Project Exoneree


Elijah Craig III/The Innocence Project

Randall Mills

Lambda Alpha Epsilon invites students to hear Randall Mills speak about his experiences with the legal and correctional systems and his work with the Innocence Project at 4 p.m. Friday, Feb. 23, in Giffels Auditorium on the second floor of Old Main.

Randall Mills was wrongfully convicted in January 2000 of rape and battery. After more than a decade in

Read more at: https://news.uark.edu/articles/40554/from-the-perspective-of-an-innocence-project-exoneree

How The Ohio Innocence Project Is Working to Free the Wrongfully Convicted

Farron Cousins is joined by Mark Godsey, professor at University of Cincinnati College of Law and director of The Ohio Innocence Project, to discuss what is being done to help innocent people who have been wrongfully convicted.

Transcript:

Farron Cousins:
Yeah, there’s absolutely no question whatsoever that the justice system in the United States is deeply flawed. Not only are we allowing white collar criminals to get away with murder and sometimes that’s quite literal, but the rate at which innocent people are going to prison should give every law abiding citizen a reason to be worried. Joining me now to discuss the problem of wrongful convictions is Mark Godsey. He’s the author of the new book Blind Injustice, a law professor at University of Cincinnati, director of the Innocence Project of Ohio. Mark, thank you for joining us today and I

Read more at: https://trofire.com/2018/02/18/ohio-innocence-project-working-free-wrongfully-convicted/

How The Ohio Innocence Project Is Working to Free the Wrongfully …

Farron Cousins is joined by Mark Godsey, professor at University of Cincinnati College of Law and director of The Ohio Innocence Project, to discuss what is being done to help innocent people who have been wrongfully convicted.

Transcript:

Farron Cousins:
Yeah, there’s absolutely no question whatsoever that the justice system in the United States is deeply flawed. Not only are we allowing white collar criminals to get away with murder and sometimes that’s quite literal, but the rate at which innocent people are going to prison should give every law abiding citizen a reason to be worried. Joining me now to discuss the problem of wrongful convictions is Mark Godsey. He’s the author of the new book Blind Injustice, a law professor at University of Cincinnati, director of the Innocence Project of Ohio. Mark, thank you for joining us today and I

Read more at: https://trofire.com/2018/02/18/ohio-innocence-project-working-free-wrongfully-convicted/

Philly man claiming innocence moves a step closer to vindication

Dontia Patterson has spent 11 years in prison for a murder he insists he didn’t commit.

On Friday, he moved a step closer to vindication.

During a brief hearing at the Criminal Justice Center, the Philadelphia District Attorney’s Office vacated Patterson’s conviction and his life sentence, agreeing that his trial lawyers were ineffective and that he deserved to be retried.

Prosecutors stopped short, however, of dropping the charges against Patterson, and he remains in custody as an accused murderer. He is due back in court in March to begin the process of preparing again to potentially face a jury.

His appellate attorneys, led by Center City lawyer Hayes Hunt, are hoping for a quicker resolution.

Hunt said he and his colleagues, including the Pennsylvania Innocence Project, have been working with the District Attorney’s Office over several months and have been shown previously undisclosed information supporting Patterson’s innocence claims, including documents

Read more at: http://www.philly.com/philly/news/crime/philly-man-claiming-innocence-moves-a-step-closer-to-vindication-20180216.html

Exoneree kicks off speaker series on the death penalty, race, and innocence

Armstrong called the audience to give Newman a standing ovation, giving her thanks for the freedom he has today and her work to prove the innocence of the wrongfully convicted. The admiration was mutual as Newman praised Armstrong for his work as an instructor and mentor in the prison during the nearly 18 years he served. 

“And to me, that’s the name of the game,” Armstrong said. “To make a difference.”

Frank Baumgartner, a political science professor, began the speaker series in 2010, with this year being the fourth installment. Baumgartner first brought the event to his POLI 203 class: Race, Innocence, and the End of the Death Penalty. Due to the small class size at the time, he decided it was not cost effective, and opened it up to the public and his students. This extension of his class to the public is part of an effort to allow the speakers

Read more at: http://www.dailytarheel.com/article/2018/02/race-innocence-0212