Tag Archives: killer

The data behind the serial-killer detector has some small issues.

The story also inspired us to check out his data. Hargrove collected as much homicide data as was available online by downloading the FBI’s Supplementary Homicide Report data from 1976–2015. He then went the extra mile to obtain additional and (until then) generally unavailable data from Alabama, Florida, Illinois, and D.C. He used unknown offender sex as a proxy for unsolved case and grouped these cases by geographic area (county or metro area), weapon, and sex. Such cases are unfortunately not uncommon, especially if the victims are women. (There are also cases of multiple homicides of young men and unknown offenders, but data suggests that women are more likely to be targeted by serial killers.) Studying these individual groups, he found that he was able to find cases of suspected serial homicides, with young women as victims and unknown offenders, and this is what led to the discovery of the

Read more at: http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2017/12/the_data_behind_the_serial_killer_detector_has_some_small_issues.html

Minnesota Supreme Court considers whether late serial killer deserves case review

Convicted Minneapolis serial killer Billy Glaze is dead. So should the courts even consider claims that he might be innocent?

State Supreme Court justices heard arguments Monday morning about whether attorneys working for the Minnesota Innocence Project have standing to continue a petition for review of Glaze’s case.

Glaze, convicted in decades-old murders of three women, had been incarcerated for 28 years when he fell ill with lung cancer and died in December 2015, amid his attorneys’ efforts to exonerate him with new DNA evidence.

A district court judge agreed with Hennepin County prosecutors last year that Glaze’s appeal died with him. Glaze hadn’t yet proven his innocence with the evidence introduced, so there was no “live controversy” to be resolved, the judge found.

Attorneys for Glaze, however, argued on appeal that the public has an interest in learning whether the justice system worked fairly. Glaze’s name still deserves

Read more at: http://www.startribune.com/minnesota-supreme-court-considers-whether-dead-serial-killer-deserves-case-review/463491253/

Minnesota Supreme Court considers whether dead serial killer deserves case review

Convicted Minneapolis serial killer Billy Glaze is dead. So should the courts even consider claims that he might be innocent?

State Supreme Court justices heard arguments Monday about whether attorneys working for the Minnesota Innocence Project have standing to continue a petition for review of Glaze’s case.

Glaze, convicted in decades-old murders of three women, had been incarcerated for 28 years when he fell ill with lung cancer and died in December 2015, amid his attorneys’ efforts to exonerate him with new DNA evidence.

A District Court judge agreed with Hennepin County prosecutors last year that Glaze’s appeal died with him. Glaze hadn’t yet proved his innocence with the evidence introduced, so there was no “live controversy” to be resolved, the judge found.

Attorneys for Glaze, however, argued on appeal that the public has an interest in learning whether the justice system worked fairly. Glaze’s name still deserves to

Read more at: http://www.startribune.com/minnesota-supreme-court-considers-whether-dead-serial-killer-deserves-case-review/463491253/

AI is unraveling the mysteries of the serial killer mind

Hunting a serial killer is, according to experts, a fundamentally different type of detective work than any other type of homicide investigation. For decades the top investigators in this hyper-specialized field have turned to technology. In 2017 this means AI, and just like everything else, it’s revolutionizing the industry.

It’s impossible to know how many active serial killers there are in the US right now. Due to law enforcement and other government reporting failures, miscategorized evidence, and genuine mystery the best estimate we have is somewhere between 25 and 340. The FBI thinks about 150 people a year are murdered by these predators. Other experts think that number is much higher.

There’s a dark future ahead for serial killers, but first machines need to understand what they’re dealing with. There’s an adage that goes “to catch a killer, you have

Read more at: https://thenextweb.com/artificial-intelligence/2017/12/07/ai-is-unraveling-the-mysteries-of-the-serial-killer-mind/

The Serial-Killer Detector

MAP has its own limitations. Since the algorithm relies on place as a search term, it is blind to killers who are nomadic over any range greater than adjacent counties. There is also a species of false positive that Hargrove calls the Flint effect: some cities, such as Flint, Michigan, are so delinquent in solving murders that they look as if they were beset by serial killers.

Someone versed in statistics can run the algorithm, which appears on MAP’s Web site. The rest of us, who might, for example, wish to know how many killings are unsolved where we live, can use the site’s “search cases” function. Deborah Smith, who lives in New Orleans, is a hobby

“My Friend Dahmer” Director Marc Meyers on the Coming-of-Age of a Serial Killer (Interview)

Filmrise

Filmmaker has made a number of smaller independents that didn’t get a lot of attention or traction, but there are a few reasons why his new movie My Friend Dahmer has deservedly been getting more attention since it premiered earlier this year at the Tribeca Film Festival.

The first reason is obvious, because there’s a growing interest in murders and serial killers thanks to shows like HBO’s The Jinx and Netflix’s Making a Murderer, but also because Jeffrey Dahmer is still one of America’s more renowned killers and also more recent than others.

Meyers’ movie is based on the graphic novel of the same name by John “Derf” Backderf, who in fact was friends with Jeffrey Dahmer in high school before his murderous streak began, but who saw first-hand the transformation of his

Read more at: http://www.tracking-board.com/my-friend-dahmer-director-marc-meyers-on-the-coming-of-age-of-a-serial-killer-interview/

Experts reveal Making a Murderer killer Steven Avery will ‘die in prison’

“At first glance, it looks like it has merit, but it’s nonsense,” he says, noting that at least SIX people (including Steven Avery) had access to that shared computer.

“Which of those people used or viewed those images? It would be impossible to come up with that information,” he concludes.

New forensic testing has also been put forward, questioning the amount of DNA the crime lab alleges Avery left on Teresa’s SUV. Kathleen Zellner claims to have conducted an experiment that disproves this, although Ken remains unconvinced. “Did [Kathleen’s] experiment replicate the conditions at the time? I doubt it,” he says.

For all the latest details on the Steven Avery case, pick up the latest issue of OK, on sale now!

Read more at: https://www.nowtolove.com.au/celebrity/celeb-news/experts-say-steven-avery-will-die-in-prison-42573

3 years later, search continues for killer of Rockingham County man

ROCKINGHAM COUNTY, Va. (WHSV) — This Friday marks three years since Richard “Ricky” Charlton was found dead at his home in Rockingham County, and no arrest has yet been made in his murder.

Charlton was described as a hard-working and friendly person, and his murder rocked the tight-knit community of the Ferguson Mobile Home Park in the Keezletown area.

“It’s pretty scary, yeah it’s pretty scary to be honest. I just feel sorry for the loss of him. I hope we can find this person who committed this crime,” said Erica, the victim’s neighbor.

Several months later, in April of 2015, the Rockingham County Sheriff’s Office and the Commonwealth Attorney’s Office announced a $10,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for the murder.

That reward is still available.

Three years later, family members and law enforcement are asking anyone in the

Read more at: http://www.whsv.com/content/news/3-years-later-search-continues-for-killer-of-Rockingham-County-man-451631343.html

He helped IMPD put away a killer. Then his death became a warning: Don’t talk to police

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In recent years, fewer of the city’s homicides have been solved.
Nate Chute/IndyStar

People remember Henry Nunn, 63, in different ways.

His wife remembers him as a Christian man. To police, he was a hero. Others remember Nunn as the guy who paid the ultimate price for testifying in court.

Nunn was killed in his home after identifying one of the men who killed his neighbor in 2012. That neighbor, as it turned out, had been a

Read more at: https://www.indystar.com/story/news/crime/2017/10/19/dont-snitch-witness-intimidation-witness-protection-indiana-indianapolis-murder-homicide/653056001/