Tag Archives: serial

Can You Use This Data Set to Find Serial Killers?

The story also inspired us to check out his data. Hargrove collected as much homicide data as was available online by downloading the FBI’s Supplementary Homicide Report data from 1976–2015. He then went the extra mile to obtain additional and (until then) generally unavailable data from Alabama, Florida, Illinois, and D.C. He used unknown offender sex as a proxy for unsolved case and grouped these cases by geographic area (county or metro area), weapon, and sex. Such cases are unfortunately not uncommon, especially if the victims are women. (There are also cases of multiple homicides of young men and unknown offenders, but data suggests that women are more likely to be targeted by serial killers.) Studying these individual groups, he found that he was able to find cases of suspected serial homicides, with young women as victims and unknown offenders, and this is what led to the discovery of the

Read more at: http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2017/12/the_data_behind_the_serial_killer_detector_has_some_small_issues.html

Minnesota Supreme Court considers whether late serial killer deserves case review

Convicted Minneapolis serial killer Billy Glaze is dead. So should the courts even consider claims that he might be innocent?

State Supreme Court justices heard arguments Monday morning about whether attorneys working for the Minnesota Innocence Project have standing to continue a petition for review of Glaze’s case.

Glaze, convicted in decades-old murders of three women, had been incarcerated for 28 years when he fell ill with lung cancer and died in December 2015, amid his attorneys’ efforts to exonerate him with new DNA evidence.

A district court judge agreed with Hennepin County prosecutors last year that Glaze’s appeal died with him. Glaze hadn’t yet proven his innocence with the evidence introduced, so there was no “live controversy” to be resolved, the judge found.

Attorneys for Glaze, however, argued on appeal that the public has an interest in learning whether the justice system worked fairly. Glaze’s name still deserves

Read more at: http://www.startribune.com/minnesota-supreme-court-considers-whether-dead-serial-killer-deserves-case-review/463491253/

Minnesota Supreme Court considers whether dead serial killer deserves case review

Convicted Minneapolis serial killer Billy Glaze is dead. So should the courts even consider claims that he might be innocent?

State Supreme Court justices heard arguments Monday about whether attorneys working for the Minnesota Innocence Project have standing to continue a petition for review of Glaze’s case.

Glaze, convicted in decades-old murders of three women, had been incarcerated for 28 years when he fell ill with lung cancer and died in December 2015, amid his attorneys’ efforts to exonerate him with new DNA evidence.

A District Court judge agreed with Hennepin County prosecutors last year that Glaze’s appeal died with him. Glaze hadn’t yet proved his innocence with the evidence introduced, so there was no “live controversy” to be resolved, the judge found.

Attorneys for Glaze, however, argued on appeal that the public has an interest in learning whether the justice system worked fairly. Glaze’s name still deserves to

Read more at: http://www.startribune.com/minnesota-supreme-court-considers-whether-dead-serial-killer-deserves-case-review/463491253/

Data Analytics Takes On Serial Killers (Aspiring Data Scientists: Try This At Home)

FILE – In this May 2, 2016 file photo, a montage of photos of alleged victims is projected on a screen in the courtroom during the during closing arguments in the serial murder trial of Lonnie Franklin Jr., seated at far left, in Los Angeles Superior Court. Franklin was convicted Thursday, May 5, 2016, of 10 murders and one attempted murder in the serial killings that were dubbed the work of the “Grim Sleeper” because of a 14-year gap in slayings that spanned two decades in South Los Angeles and targeted vulnerable young black women in the inner city. (Mark Boster/ Los Angeles Times, Pool, File)

The headlines almost scream of superhuman data analytics:

Yet the

Read more at: https://www.forbes.com/sites/metabrown/2017/12/09/data-analytics-takes-on-serial-killers-aspiring-data-scientists-try-this-at-home/

AI is unraveling the mysteries of the serial killer mind

Hunting a serial killer is, according to experts, a fundamentally different type of detective work than any other type of homicide investigation. For decades the top investigators in this hyper-specialized field have turned to technology. In 2017 this means AI, and just like everything else, it’s revolutionizing the industry.

It’s impossible to know how many active serial killers there are in the US right now. Due to law enforcement and other government reporting failures, miscategorized evidence, and genuine mystery the best estimate we have is somewhere between 25 and 340. The FBI thinks about 150 people a year are murdered by these predators. Other experts think that number is much higher.

There’s a dark future ahead for serial killers, but first machines need to understand what they’re dealing with. There’s an adage that goes “to catch a killer, you have

Read more at: https://thenextweb.com/artificial-intelligence/2017/12/07/ai-is-unraveling-the-mysteries-of-the-serial-killer-mind/

The Hunt: Atlanta’s hidden serial killers

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11Alive’s investigators are hunting down the killers through time and across the continent.

They hunt the innocent; we hunt them

ATLANTA – Our city holds a deadly secret.

Someone’s been hunting, strangling, murdering women, dating back to 1970s.

According to a homicide detective-turned professor and a former data journalist, Atlanta is likely hiding some of the most prolific serial killers in U.S. history.

They’ve never been caught, and their crimes… left cold.

Numbers, data and an algorithm have done what detectives haven’t been able to do—outline the largest cluster of unsolved strangulation murders of women in

Read more at: http://www.9news.com/news/investigations/the-hunt-atlantas-hidden-serial-killers/489519673

The Algorithm That Catches Serial Killers

“I wonder if we could teach a computer to spot serial killers in data,” Thomas Hargrove thought as he parsed the FBI’s annual homicide reports. The retired news reporter would soon answer his own question. He created an algorithm that, in his words, “can identify serial killings—and does.”

In The Dewey Decimal System of Death, a new film from FreeThink Media, Hargrove explains how “the real world is following a rather simple mathematical formula, and it’s that way with murder.”

The numbers are startling. According to Hargrove, every year, there are at least 220,000 unsolved murders in the United States. Of those murders, an estimated 2,000 are the work of serial killers. Many of these cases are not ultimately reported to the Justice Department by municipal police departments; Hargrove has assiduously obtained the data himself. His Murder Accountability Project is now the largest archive of murders in America, with

Read more at: https://www.theatlantic.com/video/index/546893/serial-killer-algorithm/

Thomas Hargrove’s Algorithm Catches Serial Killers – The Atlantic …

“I wonder if we could teach a computer to spot serial killers in data,” Thomas Hargrove thought as he parsed the FBI’s annual homicide reports. The retired news reporter would soon answer his own question. He created an algorithm that, in his words, “can identify serial killings—and does.”

In The Dewey Decimal System of Death, a new film from FreeThink, Hargrove explains how “the real world is following a rather simple mathematical formula, and it’s that way with murder.”

The numbers are startling. According to Hargrove, since 1980, there have been at least 220,000 unsolved murders in the United States. Of those murders, an estimated 2,000 are the work of serial killers. Many of these cases are not ultimately reported to the Justice Department by municipal police departments; Hargrove has assiduously obtained the data himself. His Murder Accountability Project is now the largest archive of murders in America, with

Read more at: https://www.theatlantic.com/video/index/546893/serial-killer-algorithm/

2000 Serial Killers Are Free in US, Researcher Says

There are estimated 2,000 serial killers roaming free throughout the United States, according to Thomas Hargrove, researcher and founder of the Murder Accountability Project.

Since 2010, Hargrove has been using an algorithm he created to help spot serial killings among the thousands of murders that go unsolved every year.

The algorithm spots areas with clusters of similar yet unsolved murders.

“The algorithm is based upon a reasonable premise—an active serial killer can reduce the normal [or expected] clearance rate [percentage of crimes solved] for groups of similar victims killed through similar methods,” states the Murder Accountability Project’s website.

The method is far from perfect—many such murder clusters are not the work of a serial killer, a person who murders at least two people on separate occasions, often following the same pattern.

But based on Hargrove’s findings, police in Youngstown, Ohio, and Gary, Indiana, opened new murder investigations, the website states.

His estimates for

Read more at: https://www.theepochtimes.com/2000-serial-killers-are-free-in-us-researcher-says_2365264.html

Report: There Are More Than 2000 Serial Killers At Large In America

A new report from The New Yorker reveals that it’s possible that more than 2,000 serial killers are at large in the United States. Archivist and researcher Thomas Hargrove has been tracking and analyzing data as it pertains to serial killers independently for years now.

Hargrove has been working on the Murder Accountability Project (MAP), a non-profit that collects data on murders and sends it to an algorithm Hargrove created, which he calls his serial killer detector. A serial killing, according to the FBI’s official definition, is the “unlawful killing of two or more victims by the same offender(s), in separate events.”

The F.B.I. believes that less than one percent of murders each year are conducted by serial killers. But, Hargrove thinks that this number is higher.

“How do I know?” he told the New Yorker. “A few years ago, I got some people at the F.B.I. to run the

Read more at: http://www.oxygen.com/blogs/report-there-are-more-than-2000-serial-killers-at-large-in-america