Tag Archives: supreme

Missouri Supreme Court considering future for KC man who claims innocence in 1996 double murder

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — Missouri’s Supreme Court is now considering what happens next for a Kansas City convicted killer.

Ricky Kidd was sent away nearly 22 years ago for the murders of two men. But all along he has proclaimed his innocence.

If there’s one thing Monica Gray is used to, it’s waiting. She’s been waiting 22 years for Kidd, her long-time boyfriend, to be proven innocent of the two murders.

“They’re giving us injustice,” Gray said. “The system is broken, and it needs to be fixed.”

Gray’s case is in the hands of the Midwest Innocence Project, with a legal team that includes a former Jackson County assistant prosecutor and UMKC law professor.

Although they contend Kidd never should’ve been convicted based on conflicting witness testimony, the only shot to clear his name now is with DNA.

“In our case, we won the DNA motion. We got an order that the DNA be tested

Read more at: http://fox4kc.com/2018/01/10/missouri-supreme-court-considering-future-for-kc-man-who-claims-innocence-in-1996-double-murder/

Attorneys for two men claiming innocence present their cases to Va. Supreme Court

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Read more at: http://www.richmond.com/entertainment/attorneys-for-two-men-claiming-innocence-present-their-cases-to/article_c83fd5af-a4e9-5d8c-857f-c330cd2527ad.html

Minnesota Supreme Court considers whether late serial killer deserves case review

Convicted Minneapolis serial killer Billy Glaze is dead. So should the courts even consider claims that he might be innocent?

State Supreme Court justices heard arguments Monday morning about whether attorneys working for the Minnesota Innocence Project have standing to continue a petition for review of Glaze’s case.

Glaze, convicted in decades-old murders of three women, had been incarcerated for 28 years when he fell ill with lung cancer and died in December 2015, amid his attorneys’ efforts to exonerate him with new DNA evidence.

A district court judge agreed with Hennepin County prosecutors last year that Glaze’s appeal died with him. Glaze hadn’t yet proven his innocence with the evidence introduced, so there was no “live controversy” to be resolved, the judge found.

Attorneys for Glaze, however, argued on appeal that the public has an interest in learning whether the justice system worked fairly. Glaze’s name still deserves

Read more at: http://www.startribune.com/minnesota-supreme-court-considers-whether-dead-serial-killer-deserves-case-review/463491253/

Minnesota Supreme Court considers whether dead serial killer deserves case review

Convicted Minneapolis serial killer Billy Glaze is dead. So should the courts even consider claims that he might be innocent?

State Supreme Court justices heard arguments Monday about whether attorneys working for the Minnesota Innocence Project have standing to continue a petition for review of Glaze’s case.

Glaze, convicted in decades-old murders of three women, had been incarcerated for 28 years when he fell ill with lung cancer and died in December 2015, amid his attorneys’ efforts to exonerate him with new DNA evidence.

A District Court judge agreed with Hennepin County prosecutors last year that Glaze’s appeal died with him. Glaze hadn’t yet proved his innocence with the evidence introduced, so there was no “live controversy” to be resolved, the judge found.

Attorneys for Glaze, however, argued on appeal that the public has an interest in learning whether the justice system worked fairly. Glaze’s name still deserves to

Read more at: http://www.startribune.com/minnesota-supreme-court-considers-whether-dead-serial-killer-deserves-case-review/463491253/

Supreme Court presses Lowndes judge on bite mark case status

 

The Mississippi Supreme Court has asked Circuit Judge Lee Howard in writing for a status update on a case questioning bite mark evidence that landed a Lowndes County man on death row. 

 

A post-conviction relief case for the defendant — death row inmate Eddie Lee Howard, 64 — has dragged on for almost 18 months without a ruling. Meanwhile, the Supreme Court last week overturned a conviction in a case where similar evidence was used. 

 

Eddie Lee Howard was twice convicted of the murder of 84-year-old Georgia Kemp, who was found stabbed to death in her home in February 1992. In both his convictions — the second of which was in 2000 after the state Supreme Court threw out his 1994 conviction — the prosecution presented bite mark evidence apparently taken from Kemp’s body. 

 

In 2014, the Mississippi Innocence Project took up Howard’s case, arguing bite mark evidence is a “pernicious pseudo science”

Read more at: http://www.cdispatch.com/news/article.asp?aid=61693

Columbus police illegally withheld public records, Ohio Supreme Court rules

Columbus police have illegally withheld some public records by refusing to release files on
closed criminal cases, the Ohio Supreme Court ruled this morning.

The ruling overturns the police division’s practice since 2010 to refuse to release records in
homicide and other high-profile cases to private investigators, reporters at The Dispatch and
others.

The justices found that the city improperly relied on prior court rulings, with city officials
arguing records could not be released as long as defendants still had potential appeals, which
generally can be filed at any time. Such a practice, critics said, meant records were secret until
defendants died or were freed from prison.

A lawyer for an Innocence Project who filed the lawsuit against the city had argued that
Columbus’ stance could keep the innocent in prison and true killers walking the streets since
police case files could not be examined by third parties.

The justices
split

Read more at: http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2016/12/28/Supreme-Court-rules-against-Columbus.html