Tag Archives: testing

South Dakota inmate’s case could reopen after DNA testing

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Read more at: http://www.dailyprogress.com/news/south-dakota-inmate-s-case-could-reopen-after-dna-testing/article_88af0a49-26e0-5ed2-85f7-1e8c05b83ae5.html

DNA testing could spark push for new trial in Stacy Larson murder case

A man who says he’s being held for a murder he didn’t commit might soon have DNA test results to help make his case.

Stacy Larson, 48, was convicted of second-degree murder in McCook County for the Interstate 90 shooting death of Ronald Hilgenberg in May 1990.

Larson has always maintained his innocence, however. The South Dakota Supreme Court noted issues with the case, even as it upheld the conviction.

There was no physical evidence linking Larson to the case, for example, and a co-defendant was acquitted.

Perhaps most notable was a time-stamped receipt for

Read more at: http://www.argusleader.com/story/news/2018/02/08/dna-testing-could-spark-push-new-trial-stacy-larson-murder-case/307137002/

Innocence Project seeks new DNA testing in 1995 Amherst murder

Lawyers for the Innocence Project want a state judge to order new DNA tests of evidence taken from the murder of an 82-year-old woman who was slain in her home in Amherst in 1995.

The New York City-based organization made the request on behalf of Renay Lynch, a former Buffalo prostitute and drug addict who has been imprisoned since 1998 when she was convicted for  the robbery and murder of Louise Cicelsky, who was Lynch’s landlord.

Lynch, 41 at the time of her arrest, was falsely convicted, according to attorneys Susan Friedman, Barry Scheck and Jane Fisher-Byrialsen. They claim that police bullied her into making a “false confession” to helping set up the robbery — which turned into a murder — at Cicelsky’s home on Longmeadow Road in May 1995. The defense attorneys said in court papers that they believe modern DNA testing of evidence from the scene will turn up no

Read more at: http://buffalonews.com/2018/01/18/innocence-project-seeks-new-dna-testing-in-1995-amherst-murder-case/

National forensic lab testing teeth, bones found in Missoula shed

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Read more at: http://missoulian.com/news/local/national-forensic-lab-testing-teeth-bones-found-in-missoula-shed/article_3a85a6d2-a821-573f-90a7-2f7935c51f5f.html

National forensic lab testing teeth, bones found in Missoula shed …

Whenever Dillon Kato posts new content, you’ll get an email delivered to your inbox with a link.

Email notifications are only sent once a day, and only if there are new matching items.

Read more at: http://missoulian.com/news/local/national-forensic-lab-testing-teeth-bones-found-in-missoula-shed/article_3a85a6d2-a821-573f-90a7-2f7935c51f5f.html

Children’s Bones Awaiting DNA Testing To Determine Whether They Belong To 3 Missing Brothers

Bones believed to belong to three children were undergoing DNA testing to determine whether they belonged to long-missing young brothers from Michigan. A box, containing bones and teeth, was found in a shed in Montana in September.

An anthropologist who reviewed the bones estimated they belonged to three children between the ages of 2 and 4, 5 and 8 and 6 and 10, the Detroit News reported. Authorities were working to determine whether the remains were connected with the disappearance of three brothers, aged 5, 7 and 9. The brothers, Andrew, Alexander and Tanner Skelton, went missing from Michigan in 2010.

“While it’s very interesting and something we’re following up with big time, we haven’t seen any other connections [that would link the cases],” said State Police Det. Lt. Jeremy Brewer, according to USA Today.

The National Missing and Unidentified Persons System at the University of North

Read more at: http://www.ibtimes.com/childrens-bones-awaiting-dna-testing-determine-whether-they-belong-3-missing-brothers-2631479

Innocence Project receives grant for DNA testing

It was recently announced that the Illinois Innocence Project (IIP) will receive a $641,000 federal grant, part of a United States Department of Justice Bloodsworth grant. The grant is named in honor of Kirk Bloodsworth, who was exonerated by DNA evidence in 1993 after being sentenced to the death penalty, the first such case to have happened in Illinois.

“We are incredibly grateful for this grant,” said IIP executive director John Hanlon. “Without it, we would not be able to do hardly any DNA cases.” According to Hanlon, the project’s three most recent successful DNA exoneration cases collectively cost almost $100,000 dollars in lab fees alone.

The grant is targeted to pay only for testing in cases where DNA could reasonably lead to proving that someone is wrongfully convicted in two types of cases: eyewitness misidentification (still the most common source of wrongful convictions) and false

Read more at: http://illinoistimes.com/article-19385-innocence-project-receives-grant-for-dna-testing.html

Illinois Innocence Project Wins Grant For DNA Testing

The Illinois Innocence Project, based at the University of Illinois Springfield, has won a $641,000 grant for DNA testing intended to help exonerate wrongfully convicted inmates. 

The grant will be used over the course of two years. $200,000 of the funds must be used in DNA testing for two types of cases: potential eye witness misidentifications and false confessions.

John Hanlon, Executive Director of the Illinois Innocence Project, says DNA testing is often necessary for the cases he takes on, but also very costly. The most basic test is roughly $1,000.

“The problem is, many of these cases involve evidence that’s degraded,” says Hanlon. “It’s very old so it’s degraded. When you’re dealing with degraded evidence you often have

Read more at: http://northernpublicradio.org/post/illinois-innocence-project-wins-grant-dna-testing

Grant To Fund DNA Testing For Illinois Innocence Project

The Illinois Innocence Project based at the University of Illinois Springfield has received a grant for DNA testing to help exonerate wrongfully convicted inmates.

The grant totals $641,000 and will be used over the course of two years. Of that, $200,000 must be used in DNA testing for two types of cases: potential eyewitness misidentifications and false confessions.

John Hanlon, executive director of the Illinois Innocence Project, said DNA testing is often necessary for the cases he takes on. But it’s costly, with the most basic test roughly $1,000.

“The problem is, many of these cases involve evidence that’s degraded. It’s very old so it’s degraded. When you’re dealing with degraded evidence you often have to start with the basic kind of procedures to get a DNA profile, but then they often have to go to second and third levels, and every level costs more.”

The grant will also be used to pay attorney

Read more at: http://wglt.org/post/grant-fund-dna-testing-illinois-innocence-project